Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

EFF: New copyright provisions in the TPP are ridiculous

Ever created a meme that went viral? Hollywood wants you to go to jail for that.

Article by Maira Sutton for EFF

The Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement (TPP) poses massive threats to users in a dizzying number of ways. It will force other TPP signatories to accept the United States' excessive copyright terms of a minimum of life of the author plus 70 years, while locking the US to the same lengths so it will be harder to shorten them in the future. It contains DRM anti-circumvention provisions that will make it a crime to tinker with, hack, re-sell, preserve, and otherwise control any number of digital files and devices that you own. The TPP will encourage ISPs to monitor and police their users, likely leading to more censorship measures such as the blockage and filtering of content online in the name of copyright enforcement. And in the most recent leak of the TPP's Intellectual Property chapter, we found an even more alarming provision on trade secrets that could be used to crackdown on journalists and whistleblowers who report on corporate wrongdoing.

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Daily Dot: The Internet is crashing the TPP's party

Internet activists got all up in TPP negotiators' faces yesterday.

Article by Dell Cameron for The Daily Dot

Fed up with secret meetings that will decide the future of trade for more than a dozen nations, a number of protesters swarmed a congressional hearing on the TPP Tuesday morning.

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CBC: Oh, the irony

The government just announced $9 million to promote free expression on the Internet abroad, but what are they doing to prevent censorship here at home?

Article by Evan Dyer for the CBC

Canada wants to help undermine repressive regimes using the power of the web, says Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird, who announced Tuesday his government is throwing its support behind a "digital public square" project launched by the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.

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$9 million for free expression abroad. Now how will the government prevent censorship at home?

Yesterday, the government announced a joint program with the Munk School of Global Affairs to help Internet users in authoritarian countries circumvent Internet censorship.

The $9 million initiative is designed to promote free expression online, which has been declining thanks to repressive regimes cracking down on Internet users around the globe. Countries like Iran and Russia have been using various techniques to curb online criticism, such as blocking, filtering, and imprisoning people who speak out.

Millions of Internet users around the globe have been speaking out against online censorship, advocating for stronger rules to protect free expression and sharing techniques for getting around government-imposed online blocks.

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Who is the real Goliath here?

Last week’s massive email leak at Sony revealed a number of unsavoury things about the company from the racist comments of Sony co-chairman Amy Pascal, to the company’s scramble to avoid provoking an international incident in the upcoming Judd Apatow comedy The Interview, to the fact that Oscar-winner and A-lister Jennifer Lawrence was paid less than her male counterparts in American Hustle.

It also provided some pretty hilarious celebrity inside gossip, like that George Clooney is super sad that no one liked The Monuments Men, Sony thinks Adam Sandler is terrible, too, and that Channing Tatum writes emails to studio executives like an 18-year old frat boy (to be fair, if I was Channing Tatum I’d totally write emails like that).

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OpenMedia delivers letter from 48 leading organizations calling for full text of TPP to be released to enable public debate

This week, our own Free Expression Campaigner Meghan Sali travelled to Washington, D.C., to hand-deliver an exciting new letter organized by our friends at the Electronic Frontier Foundation and 47 other civil society organizations calling on TPP negotiators to release the text of the Trans Pacific Partnership.

The letter represents a large and diverse group of experts and public interest groups have come together to call out the secrecy surrounding the talks. Together, these organizations say it’s time for TPP negotiators to follow the lead of the European Commission, which recently announced it would release the draft text of a similar Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) deal in the name of greater transparency.

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