Cell Phones

Over 250,000 people shape action plan to save the Internet

Digital rights group OpenMedia releases comprehensive election platform packed with ideas crowdsourced from Canadians

August 27, 2015 – It's as if the entire city of London Ontario banded together to save the Internet. Shaped by more than 250,000 people and launching today, Canada's Digital Future is a crowd-sourced election platform packed with ideas from everyday citizens. It’s an initiative of digital rights group Openmedia, which is urging people to consider Canada's digital future when casting their vote this election.

While OpenMedia won’t be endorsing any political party, it does plan to meet the main parties and report back as to which are most committed to implementing its platform. Thousands of people have already pledged to vote for the future of the Internet in the upcoming election.

“Whether it’s telecom price-gouging, reckless spying legislation, or abusive copyright notices, failed digital policies are hurting Canadians,” said OpenMedia’s communications manager David Christopher. “Young people in particular are speaking up for a better way forward, because Canada can’t afford to keep falling behind our international counterparts. That’s why this election will be the most important Canadian Internet users have ever faced.”

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Globe & Mail: Indies ask CRTC to open networks, lower prices

Good news - indie cell phone companies have launched a new CRTC challenge, aimed at opening our wireless networks and lowering prices for all Canadians. Speak out at https://UnblockCanada.ca

Article by Christine Dobby for The Globe and Mail

A group of independent Internet providers has launched a challenge of a landmark ruling on wholesale wireless services, arguing that Canada’s telecom regulator should have gone further to support more competition in the cellular industry.

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Nowak: "A worse proposition than almost anywhere"

It's official: the price is too damn high. And that's the message that the CRTC needs to hear from you. Send your message at http://unblockcanada.ca/?src=fba

Article by Peter Nowak for Alphabeatic
 
Bell has officially announced the availability and pricing of its gigabit fibre broadband service, and it’s as expensive as expected.

The full speed – 940 megabits per second download and 100 Mbps upload with unlimited usage – costs a whopping $149 per month. One step down – 300 Mbps download and 100 Mbps up with 750 gigabytes of monthly usage – is $95. The 150 Mbps download tier, with 50 Mbps upload and 500 GB usage, is $85 a month.


T-Mobile free roaming initiative could add fuel to Canada's wireless market

T-Mobile announced yesterday it will allow its American customers use their service in Canada and Mexico with no extra fees (that's right, free roaming). This new initiative puts the Big Three's roaming plans to shame. Why can't Canadians have nice things?

Article by Peter Nowak for Alphabeatic

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Topics: Cell Phones

Wireless prices are so high that a black market is now emerging

Cheaper plans being sold on Kijiji? This has got to stop! 

Article by Peter Nowak for Alphabeatic

You know wireless pricing in Canada is messed up when there’s a black market emerging to provide people with better deals.

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Topics: Cell Phones

Rogers is officially approved to take control of Mobilicity

This will mean fewer choices for Canadian cell phone subscribers when wireless prices are already increasing at 3 times the rate of inflation.  Speak out now at http://openmedia.ca/gatekeepers

Article by Ian Hardy for Mobile Syrup

Rogers announced today it has received all governmental, creditor and court approvals to officially acquire Mobilicity’s spectrum and subscriber base, as well as Shaw’s AWS spectrum.

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Topics: Cell Phones

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