Cell Phones

AlphaBeatic: A wolf in Fido's clothing

Last week we wrote about new plans from Rogers-owned Fido to make competing apps and services more expensive (details here: http://bit.ly/1DgdmP7). Today, it looks like they are continuing on this path to violate #NetNeutrality, announcing a new deal that will make certain music streaming services more expensive on their networks. Once again, telecom giants are trying to make the Internet more like cable TV by controlling what we see and hear online. Do you think they should have this power? Or should they have to treat all services equally?

Article by Peter Nowak for AlphaBeatic

When is something that isn’t zero rated really something that is zero rated? That’s the question Rogers’ new deal with Spotify brings up.

Zero rating is an emerging issue in the fight over net neutrality. It’s where an internet provider discounts a certain use of the internet – say a specific messaging app or video streaming service – from customers’ monthly data caps. Other apps that aren’t so chosen continue to be counted against those limits.

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CBC: You won't believe why Bell blacklisted this teenager's phone

Well folks, it looks like Bell is at it again – and they're taking price-gouging to new lows. They're abusing their power to push Canadians into buying new phones instead of used ones – and are going as far as unfairly disabling phones.

Article by Kathy Tomlinson

A Montreal father is taking on Canada’s largest telecom, after Bell blacklisted his teenager’s phone — not because it was reported stolen, but because the original buyer didn’t pay Bell for the device under contract. Read more »


Are Rogers and Fido planning to make competing mobile services more expensive for Canadians?

Your OpenMedia team recently got wind of new plans afoot by Rogers’ subsidiary Fido to make competing apps and services more expensive over their mobile networks, and it’s certainly cause for concern.

Based on a recent article from Mobile Syrup, it appears that the carrier intends to create unfair incentives for customers that privilege certain services–their own–over others, violating the principle of net neutrality. Mobile Syrup reports:

New customers will be shifting towards a loyalty-based membership program focused on rewards like credit towards streaming music and a certain allotment of video streaming (with a heavy emphasis on Rogers’ Vice Media partnership).


Expert Report reveals which telecom companies have your back when it comes to being transparent about protecting privacy

Report provides Canadians with an at-a-glance tool to rate their Internet provider’s transparency around privacy safeguards. Indie ISP Teksavvy “stands out” as the best of the 10 major retailers measured.

March 12, 2015A report published this morning has revealed that Canadian Internet providers are still falling short when it comes to being transparent about how they protect their customers’ privacy. The report found that all telecom companies need to do more to keep customers informed about how they safeguard privacy. Independent ISP Teksavvy performed best of the 10 major retailers, with telecom giant Shaw and Quebec-based Videotron languishing at the bottom.

The report, entitled Keeping Internet Users in the Know or in the Dark?, is released by IXmaps.ca and New Transparency Projects as part of a project spearheaded by Prof. Andrew Clement at the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto and Dr. Jonathan Obar, Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, with the assistance of a group of law students at UofT. They examined the data privacy transparency policies of 43 large and small companies that provide internet services to Canadians. Some of these companies are well-known Canadian Internet retailers, while others, some operating from the U.S. and elsewhere, work behind the scenes to route Canadian Internet traffic.

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CBC: There's never been a better time to improve scrutiny of our spy agencies

Edward Snowden reveals just how weak Canada's spying oversight framework is.

Article by CBC News

U.S. National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden says Canada has one of the "weakest oversight" frameworks for intelligence gathering in the Western world.

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New Wireless auction results point to improved wireless service choice for Canadians

Industry Minister James Moore has announced the outcome of the AWS-3 wireless spectrum auction. Proactive spectrum rules appear to have ensured independent providers have the infrastructure they need to expand services.

For Immediate Release

March 6, 2014 – Industry Minister James Moore has just announced the outcome of the key AWS-3 wireless spectrum auction that took place on March 3, 2015. Due in part to rules set up to increase choice for Canadians, independent cell phone service Wind successfully obtained an important portion of spectrum in this auction. Wind grew it’s spectrum assets by 180% in Alberta, BC, and Ontario. Read more »


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