Affordability

Federal Court of Appeal allows Bell Mobility to challenge university student, single mother, seniors’ organization and others in court over recent CRTC ruling on Mobile TV

April 2, 2015Today’s the Federal Court of Appeal announced that Bell Mobility will be allowed to challenge a recent CRTC decision prohibiting the telecom giant from making competing apps and services more expensive. The decision means that Bell could potentially seek legal costs from university student Ben Klass, a single mother, and a senior citizens’ organization, amongst other respondents, if they have their say in court.

Responding to the news, OpenMedia Campaigns Manager Josh Tabish had this to say:

“After over a year of unpaid hard work from citizens to convince policy-makers that Bell should not be allowed to tilt the playing field in their favour, the company is dragging ‘the little guy’ to court for years so they can regain the power to make the Internet more like cable TV.”

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AlphaBeatic: A wolf in Fido's clothing

Last week we wrote about new plans from Rogers-owned Fido to make competing apps and services more expensive (details here: http://bit.ly/1DgdmP7). Today, it looks like they are continuing on this path to violate #NetNeutrality, announcing a new deal that will make certain music streaming services more expensive on their networks. Once again, telecom giants are trying to make the Internet more like cable TV by controlling what we see and hear online. Do you think they should have this power? Or should they have to treat all services equally?

Article by Peter Nowak for AlphaBeatic

When is something that isn’t zero rated really something that is zero rated? That’s the question Rogers’ new deal with Spotify brings up.

Zero rating is an emerging issue in the fight over net neutrality. It’s where an internet provider discounts a certain use of the internet – say a specific messaging app or video streaming service – from customers’ monthly data caps. Other apps that aren’t so chosen continue to be counted against those limits.

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CBC: You won't believe why Bell blacklisted this teenager's phone

Well folks, it looks like Bell is at it again – and they're taking price-gouging to new lows. They're abusing their power to push Canadians into buying new phones instead of used ones – and are going as far as unfairly disabling phones.

Article by Kathy Tomlinson

A Montreal father is taking on Canada’s largest telecom, after Bell blacklisted his teenager’s phone — not because it was reported stolen, but because the original buyer didn’t pay Bell for the device under contract. Read more »


Are Rogers and Fido planning to make competing mobile services more expensive for Canadians?

Your OpenMedia team recently got wind of new plans afoot by Rogers’ subsidiary Fido to make competing apps and services more expensive over their mobile networks, and it’s certainly cause for concern.

Based on a recent article from Mobile Syrup, it appears that the carrier intends to create unfair incentives for customers that privilege certain services–their own–over others, violating the principle of net neutrality. Mobile Syrup reports:

New customers will be shifting towards a loyalty-based membership program focused on rewards like credit towards streaming music and a certain allotment of video streaming (with a heavy emphasis on Rogers’ Vice Media partnership).


Bell president Kevin Crull should resign after being caught censoring CTV news coverage

Bell president Kevin Crull should resign after being caught censoring CTV news coverage

March 25, 2015Responding to reports that Bell directly interfered with CTV News coverage of CRTC decisions promising Canadians more affordable and flexibility in telecom options, OpenMedia Campaigns Manager Josh Tabish had said this to say:

“Sadly, we’re concerned with repeated reports that Bell’s President Kevin Crull is bullying his company’s news outlets into burying stories crucial to Canadians. Ordering staff to ban CRTC Chair Jean Pierre Blais from the airwaves is embarrassment to the country. Kevin Crull should resign immediately in order to restore Canadians’ confidence in the integrity and impartiality of CTV and other Bell-owned news broadcasts.”

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Topics: Affordability

In win for customers, Federal Court of Appeal denies Bell Mobility’s request to continue controversial Mobile TV service until court case is resolved

Court rules that Bell must stop discriminating against competing apps and services as per CRTC order, allowing other content providers to operate on a level playing field.

March 23, 2015The Federal Court of Appeal today dismissed Bell Mobility’s request to continue offering their controversial Mobile TV service while they appeal a recent CRTC decision that found the company to be unlawfully making competing mobile video apps and services more expensive. The Court said that "Bell has not established that it will suffer irreparable harm” if the Mobile TV service is banned until the appeal is resolved.

In January, the CRTC forced companies like Bell to stop exempting their own services from monthly data caps. Bell was caught marking up competing video services by up to 800%. While the company was given until April 29 to comply, Bell announced they would appeal the decision. The Court is currently deciding whether they’ll hear the case, and today’s announcement means that Bell cannot continue the practice in the interim.

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Topics: Affordability

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