Affordability

Over 250,000 people shape action plan to save the Internet

Digital rights group OpenMedia releases comprehensive election platform packed with ideas crowdsourced from Canadians

August 27, 2015 – It's as if the entire city of London Ontario banded together to save the Internet. Shaped by more than 250,000 people and launching today, Canada's Digital Future is a crowd-sourced election platform packed with ideas from everyday citizens. It’s an initiative of digital rights group Openmedia, which is urging people to consider Canada's digital future when casting their vote this election.

While OpenMedia won’t be endorsing any political party, it does plan to meet the main parties and report back as to which are most committed to implementing its platform. Thousands of people have already pledged to vote for the future of the Internet in the upcoming election.

“Whether it’s telecom price-gouging, reckless spying legislation, or abusive copyright notices, failed digital policies are hurting Canadians,” said OpenMedia’s communications manager David Christopher. “Young people in particular are speaking up for a better way forward, because Canada can’t afford to keep falling behind our international counterparts. That’s why this election will be the most important Canadian Internet users have ever faced.”

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Yahoo: Super-fast gigabit Internet service finally coming to (some) Canadians

Our own Josh Tabish explains in this article the importance of high-speed fibre Internet for all Canadians and why it took Canada so long to adopt this technology. 

Artice by Brian Chin for Yahoo News 

If you're tired of waiting for your TV shows or movies to finish downloading, you can now take advantage of Canada's fastest internet.

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Topics: Affordability

Are Canada’s Big Telecom giants hiring U.S. firms attacking VMedia Inc., a small Canadian ISP?

Why is a foreign, U.S.-based public relations firm attacking a small Canadian indie ISP, VMedia, Inc.? That’s a question some Canadians may be asking in response to a recent public debate over the direction of Canada’s digital future.

Over the past few weeks, a debate about the future of independent (i.e. non-Big Telecom) Internet services has been playing out in the pages of the Financial Post following a recent win for Canadians at the CRTC.

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Globe & Mail: Indies ask CRTC to open networks, lower prices

Good news - indie cell phone companies have launched a new CRTC challenge, aimed at opening our wireless networks and lowering prices for all Canadians. Speak out at https://UnblockCanada.ca

Article by Christine Dobby for The Globe and Mail

A group of independent Internet providers has launched a challenge of a landmark ruling on wholesale wireless services, arguing that Canada’s telecom regulator should have gone further to support more competition in the cellular industry.

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Nowak: "A worse proposition than almost anywhere"

It's official: the price is too damn high. And that's the message that the CRTC needs to hear from you. Send your message at http://unblockcanada.ca/?src=fba

Article by Peter Nowak for Alphabeatic
 
Bell has officially announced the availability and pricing of its gigabit fibre broadband service, and it’s as expensive as expected.

The full speed – 940 megabits per second download and 100 Mbps upload with unlimited usage – costs a whopping $149 per month. One step down – 300 Mbps download and 100 Mbps up with 750 gigabytes of monthly usage – is $95. The 150 Mbps download tier, with 50 Mbps upload and 500 GB usage, is $85 a month.


Globe & Mail: Bell's new fibre service comes with a super-high price tag attached

In Sandy, Oregon residents pay just US $60 a month (about $80 Canadian) for symmetrical gigabit fibre Internet. Here in Canada, telecom giant Bell is charging $150 for a service with capped upload speeds. If you've had enough, speak out at UnblockCanada.ca today.

Article by Shane Dingman for The Globe and Mail

Until recently there weren’t a lot of options in Canada if you wanted gigabit Internet speeds at your house. A few small towns, such as Olds, Alta., rolled out municipal broadband, and several companies have launched pilot projects in condominium buildings. 
 
But as of Monday, Bell Canada is claiming 1.3 million homes in Ontario and Quebec could gain access to very high-speed downloads (up to 940 megabytes per second), which would be the widest service available thus far. That expands to 2.2 million homes by the end of the year.
 
The only downside may be the price, and the conditions.

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