Action Plan

Over 250,000 people shape action plan to save the Internet

Digital rights group OpenMedia releases comprehensive election platform packed with ideas crowdsourced from Canadians

August 27, 2015 – It's as if the entire city of London Ontario banded together to save the Internet. Shaped by more than 250,000 people and launching today, Canada's Digital Future is a crowd-sourced election platform packed with ideas from everyday citizens. It’s an initiative of digital rights group Openmedia, which is urging people to consider Canada's digital future when casting their vote this election.

While OpenMedia won’t be endorsing any political party, it does plan to meet the main parties and report back as to which are most committed to implementing its platform. Thousands of people have already pledged to vote for the future of the Internet in the upcoming election.

“Whether it’s telecom price-gouging, reckless spying legislation, or abusive copyright notices, failed digital policies are hurting Canadians,” said OpenMedia’s communications manager David Christopher. “Young people in particular are speaking up for a better way forward, because Canada can’t afford to keep falling behind our international counterparts. That’s why this election will be the most important Canadian Internet users have ever faced.”

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Globe & Mail: Bell's new fibre service comes with a super-high price tag attached

In Sandy, Oregon residents pay just US $60 a month (about $80 Canadian) for symmetrical gigabit fibre Internet. Here in Canada, telecom giant Bell is charging $150 for a service with capped upload speeds. If you've had enough, speak out at UnblockCanada.ca today.

Article by Shane Dingman for The Globe and Mail

Until recently there weren’t a lot of options in Canada if you wanted gigabit Internet speeds at your house. A few small towns, such as Olds, Alta., rolled out municipal broadband, and several companies have launched pilot projects in condominium buildings. 
 
But as of Monday, Bell Canada is claiming 1.3 million homes in Ontario and Quebec could gain access to very high-speed downloads (up to 940 megabytes per second), which would be the widest service available thus far. That expands to 2.2 million homes by the end of the year.
 
The only downside may be the price, and the conditions.

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Geist: Isn't it time we gave Canada’s Net Neutrality protections some teeth?

Canada’s telecom giants are continuing to over-promise and under-deliver when it comes to speed and connectivity. Isn’t it time we started penalizing ISPs who flout the rules?
 
Article by Prof. Michael Geist
 
Canada’s net neutrality rules, which require Internet providers to disclose how they manage their networks and to treat content in an equal manner, were established in 2009. The policy is administered by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), which releases quarterly reports on the number of complaints it receives and whether any have been escalated to enforcement actions.

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In a win for Canadians, CRTC promises fair rules to increase independent choice and affordability for fiber Internet access

New rules ensure that Canadians will be able to access an affordable range of services from a variety of providers outside Canada’s telecom giants

July 22, 2015A major ruling today from the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) signals a significant step forward for Canadians’ ability to access affordable Internet options independent of Canada’s large telecom providers, says OpenMedia.ca.

In late 2014, OpenMedia delivered crowdsourced input from over 30,000 Canadians as part of the hearing that informed today’s decision–and is claiming victory.

The ruling is the first step towards ensuring small independent ISPs are able to sell fibre Internet in Canada, which should expand access and affordability for users. Canada currently lags behind most developed countries when it comes to fibre access. Canada’s Big Telecom operators currently control 92% of the Internet market and Canadians face some of the highest prices for Internet in the industrialized world.

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We are hosting a Social Media Town Hall Q&A on the state of Canada’s Internet. Join us!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UPDATE: OUR TOWN HALL Q&A IS HAPPENING LIVE NOW! GET ALL THE INFO YOU NEED HERE.

As you may have heard, OpenMedia has been collaborating with experts at the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) to launch a new open source Internet Performance Test that will help us better understand Canada’s Internet. By using the tool, you’ll help build a wealth of knowledge that researchers, policy-makers, and everyday Internet users can use to help build a better Internet.

To get the word out, we’ve assembled a team of all-star Internet experts and advocates to talk with you about the new tool, and the future of the net. Together, we’re hosting a Social Media Town Hall Q&A on Thursday, June 11 from 10am to 6pm PST, and they want you to ask them anything that comes to mind.

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Federal Court of Appeal allows Bell Mobility to challenge university student, single mother, seniors’ organization and others in court over recent CRTC ruling on Mobile TV

April 2, 2015Today’s the Federal Court of Appeal announced that Bell Mobility will be allowed to challenge a recent CRTC decision prohibiting the telecom giant from making competing apps and services more expensive. The decision means that Bell could potentially seek legal costs from university student Ben Klass, a single mother, and a senior citizens’ organization, amongst other respondents, if they have their say in court.

Responding to the news, OpenMedia Campaigns Manager Josh Tabish had this to say:

“After over a year of unpaid hard work from citizens to convince policy-makers that Bell should not be allowed to tilt the playing field in their favour, the company is dragging ‘the little guy’ to court for years so they can regain the power to make the Internet more like cable TV.”

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