Kill Bill C-51
Our Digital Future: A crowdsourced agenda for Free Expression
Stop Big Media's Shakedown

Big Telecom are trying to make the Internet like cable TV and we have to stop them

Last week, one of Canada’s Big Telecom giants announced a controversial new scheme that will give them more power to control how you use the Internet on your mobile devices – and, if we don’t speak up, the Big Three will soon follow suit.

Videotron wants the power to hand-choose which mobile streaming apps and services are more expensive than others. How are they doing this? By bundling them into outdated Cable-TV-style packages for mobile phone users. As a result, they’re giving unfair advantage to the services they decide are “worthy” of our attention and discriminating against others – an anti-user practice that positions them as gatekeepers of our mobile networks, and violates Canada’s open Internet (AKA: Net Neutrality) rules.

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Vice: Canadian Cops Want to Search Your Mail

Update: The RCMP is now going after your mail.

Article by Justin Ling for Vice

With a federal election in its home stretch, Canada's chiefs of police have issued a wish list of investigative powers they are hoping that the country's next prime minister can deliver — everything from allowing them to search Canadians' mail, to pulling back the curtain on anonymity online.

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Topics: Online Spying

Common Sense Canadian: Why privacy matters in this Canadian election

Most Canadians do not want to give up their privacy rights. This election, will you vote for online privacy? Pledge your vote at OurDigitalFuture.ca

Article by Kevin Grandia for Common Sense Canadian 

While you are out this weekend enjoying the last days of summer on the beach and the RCMP come by to check whether your cooler is full of (gasp) beer or wine, you have every right to tell them (I would suggest politely) that no, they cannot look in your cooler.

Arstechnica: Videotron provoking net neutrality fight with unlimited music

Instead of giving Big Telecom giants the power to choose which online apps and services are more expensive, why don't they treat all services equally? Let's put Canadians in the driver's seat – not these out of touch telecom giants.

Article by Peter Nowak for Arstechnica

Quebec wireless provider Videotron looks to be stepping into a net neutrality battle with a new unlimited music service that boasts “zero data usage.” But is the offer offside Canada’s fair internet rules? Unlike previous, similar situations involving the country’s wireless carriers, this one isn’t as cut and dried.

Topics: Cell Phones

Barking Technology: Bell still claims to have a right to charge customers for a non-existent service

Bell is continuing to fight to charge customers for a 911 service that did not exist...

Article by William Neilson for Barking Technology

The Toronto Sun has a rather shocking story of Bell Canada’s continued fight to assert that they were legally allowed to charge customers a monthly fee for a 911 service that did not exist.

Dating back to 2007, Bell Canada customers in several Canadian Territories were charged 75 cents a month for a 911 service that never existed. Those who called this 911 service were rerouted to a 10-digit number and a subsequent message stating: “There are no 911 services in this area. Please hang up and dial the emergency number for your area. Or hang up and dial zero to reach an operator.” When residents would therefore dial zero, they then received a recorded message stating “in case of emergency, hang up and dial *911”.

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Topics: Cell Phones

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